Building The Gulf of False Hope, Part 3: The Saint’s Calendar

YOU CANNOT HAVE A MEANINGFUL CAMPAIGN IF STRICT TIME RECORDS ARE NOT KEPT.

– Gary Gygax, Dungeon Master’s Guide

Considering the nature of the type of game I want to run in The Gulf I feel that this line from Gygax rings true for this particular game, even if it might not hold for some more narrative type games. For this purpose, and because I think it is neat, I’d like to have a formal calendar that is used by the People of Asila, and, Therefore, the Settlers of the Gulf. While I will mess with the length of a year/months/weeks, I am going to keep an approximate 24 hour day, with normal earth like time-keeping, just to keep things simple. Continue reading

Building the Gulf of False Hope (Part 2)

The promised part two of setting information to the Gulf of False Hope is finally here. It’s taken a while, but the Gulf has never been far from my mind when daydreaming about roleplaying ideas or for my next game. It is definitely high up on the list of games I want to run, but I ended up starting up the one on one Burning Wheel games instead because my current schedule required something fixed and consistent. I’ll get to it, but it might not be as soon as I would like. I’ll keep posting my ideas as soon as I have enough that are both A) typed up and B) I am okay with my future players reading. This post concerns the major settlements in the Gulf as well as the dominant religion among the Settlers.

The Settlements of the Gulf

In the decades since the people of Asila began returning to Pericolosa, each new batch of settlers tends to either stick to the relatively safe coastal settlements, or strike out on their own and found their own new village out in the wilds. Even the largest towns of the gulf can hardly compare to Asila’s sprawling major cities, but they have been growing at a rather impressive rate. This collection of towns was inspired by the “Prepare Thyself” section of Torchbearer.

Ashford’s Folly: The largest and oldest of the new wave of settlements in the Gulf (although there are some isolated hold outs from previous attempts that are older), and is the major port for trade with Asila. It was named for Timothy Ashford, captain of the ship that brought the first batch of settlers (who is rather old, but alive when the game starts), and intended as an ironic jab at the naysayers of the time. Ashford’s Folly is a hub of imports and exports, of both people, goods and information. Any requests from patrons (or potential patrons) in The Salvatian League or newly rediscovered information/rumors about the gulf from Salvatian achieves come through Ashford’s Folly first.

Citadel of the Saints: Nestled high on coastal cliffs, the Citadel is an ancient building that has been claimed by a more orthodox sect of The Way (see below) as a base for their Pericolosan ministry. A prolonged renovation effort is being undertaken on the Citadel itself, both to restore the damage of time has done to it, and to strip any remaining remnants of objects of worship that predate the way. As a result, around the Citadel has developed a small boomtown full of artisans, builders, craftsmen, and the various support services that they require. All of this falls under the jurisdiction of the clergy, which do their best to maintain strict order. The Citadel is always in demand for rare building materials from brave souls willing to go find them. In addition, while the church does not officially buy artifacts, those that can retrieve lost relics of the Saint-Heroes and “donate” them to the church are frequently rewarded with “Gifts of Gratitude” which conveniently is often cash.

New Callumsville: A Trading town located at the crossroads of the route between Ashford’s Folly, the Citadel, and Dalmand. New Callumsville is the largest Halfling majority town in the region, and the second largest settlement overall. The majority of the buildings are uncomfortably small for Humans and Elves, although a Dwarf can make do just fine. The area around New Callumsville is often troubled by bandits, who think the small stature of the residents, combined with the wealth that flows through it, makes it a tempting target.

The Elda Spires: Unquestionably the oldest still active settlement in the Gulf, the Elda Spires is a hidden village of elves. Protected through obscurity and glamours, the Spires have lasted through many disasters that have otherwise wiped out the previous inhabitants of the Gulf. The way to the Spires is only known by the elves, and even then, only among the elves who were born there. As such, much about this town is surrounded in mystery. It is likely that the residents of the spires would know a great many secrets about the surrounding area.

The Mine of Dalmand: The Mine of Dalmand is, by Dwarven standards, an outpost at best. By the standards of the Gulf, it is a fairly respectable town in its own right, and the largest concentration of Dwarves in the Gulf. Dug centuries ago by Dwarven miners, the Mine of Dalmand was an iron mine, a spin off of a lost Dwarven Hold much deeper inland. Recently, a new vein of ore has been discovered, and the Mine has become the Gulf’s primary source of iron and steel. Still, most of the Dwarves in Dalmand see it as only a staging area until they can rediscover and reclaim their lost hold. As such, brave explorers will be paid good coin for useful information about the location and state of said hold.

Tower of Vazadrax the Mad: Vazadrax’s Tower is a magical research facility that was set up in the Gulf shortly after the founding of Ashford’s Folly. Magical research is not exactly safe, and as such, Vazadrax’s patrons (which are rumored to be one or more of the dukes themselves) in the League preferred that he did it as far away as possible. Contrary to the image of the recluse wizard, Vazadrax’s work takes a number of apprentices, scholars, and laborers, and the Tower maintains a small attendant town for that purpose. Vazadrax and his apprentices are very interested in the dangerous specimens of the Gulf, and there is money to be made in delivering persevered bodies of such creatures, or even better, live specimens.

Outlying Villages: In addition to those listed above, there are several dozen smaller Salvatian settlements populated by brave souls willing to venture farther inland than most presently dare. These settlements range from log cabins of recluse hermits, to up and coming villages of around 200 people. Some of these villages were established this far out precisely because they wanted to be left alone, while others like nothing better than to see some of their fellow countrymen. Still, all these outlying settlements, even more than the major ones listed above, are at risk from the fell beasts and dangerous monsters of the gulf.

Monster Villages and Holdouts: Some of the more intelligent and social creatures of the Gulf form into communities not unlike the small villages the Salvati have formed. Depending of the temperament of the creatures (which can vary even among those of the same kind), they might be hostile, or they might be willing to attempt to communicate (although they are unlikely to speak Salvati, which would make such attempts difficult without specialized knowledge). If communication can be established, such groups may be willing to trade or providing lodging to traveling adventurers, however, such offers may also be a ruse with the intent to devour, replace, or otherwise take advantage of such travelers.
While their numbers are few and far between, there are also small surviving communities of previous attempts to settle the Gulf. They are slightly more likely to speak Salvati, but these people have spent many generations in a very dangerous environment, isolated from Asila. These holdout settlements have as more in common with the description of monster villages than they do with the newer Outlying Villages. If brave explorers can find trustworthy ones. both Monster and Holdout Villages might have plenty to teach about survival in the Gulf.

The Divine Way of the Saint-Heroes

The largest religion in Asila (and, therefore among the settlers of the Gulf) is the Divine Way of the Saint-Heroes. The Way practices a tradition of worshiping great holy men and heroes of ages past who they believe have ascended into Saints, either during their life or upon their death. They do not worship any gods, believing them to have long left the world, but through the history of The Way, many gods or other religions have been “reinterpreted” as Saint-Heroes in order to bring its practitioners into the fold.

The Way believes that the next world is a hierarchy, under the Saint-Heroes, with the rest being ordered by how closely they followed the Saint’s teachings in life. The orthodox teachings involve strict discipline, self-denial, and pursuit of perfection in your chosen profession or craft, in order to best emulate the suffering and the struggle the Saint-Heroes underwent in their lives. The actual lives of those that ascended to Sainthood are rather varied, and as such, there are a large number of heresies of The Way, that argue for a different (often more hedonistic) path. The orthodox and unorthodox sects are often in conflict, sometimes armed, and other times simply ideologically. The orthodox sects tend to be larger, and aligned with Law, while the Chaos aligned sects tend to be individually smaller, but are more numerous. The Saint-Heroes as a whole however, run the gambit of alignment, and there are plenty of local and itinerant preachers who preach The Way without regard for such things.


I think that’ll do it for now. I still want to make a calendar for this world, and I am work shopping dungeon seeds/ideas but those I’ll probably keep secret (at least until such a time that my players have cleared them out to such an extent that sharing them would no longer be a spoiler). I’ll post more when I got more that I think is post able!

Building the Gulf of False Hope (Part 1)

I’m still kicking around the idea of that West Marches game I mentioned a few weeks back. I haven’t really got the ball rolling because I am not really sure if I have the time to commit to running it on top of my non-gaming obligations, which are kind of up in the air at this point. We’ll see where things settle, and worst case I will just have to wait until my schedule clears up to actually try to get anything off the ground.

Still, I have spent some time thinking about the region itself, both in terms of some cultural elements, physical geography, and other background information. This is more of a brain dump for my own benefit than anything I expect my future players to read, but if they (or you) are interested in this random world building stuff, feel free to read on.

Basics

As I briefly mentioned in the previously linked post, the setting is the “Gulf of False Hope”, a large natural bay across the sea from the civilized world. The Gulf appears a natural landing site for would be colonists attempting to tame the continent, and there have been several attempts to do so in the past. While some of these attempts lasted longer than others, all eventually met their end, which is how the Gulf earned its name.

Still, in every age there are those that are willing to risk it all for a chance to start over or improve their lot, and the Gulf has once again begun to see an influx of migrants believing that they will succeed where those that came before failed.

The game will start about 40 years after the first of the newest wave of settlers arrive on the Gulf. Humans, Halflings, and even young Dwarves will be young could easily have been born in the Gulf area. Elves, meanwhile have almost all been born overseas, but it is said that there is a hidden village of Elves that has survived since the last previous attempt. The coastal areas have mostly been cleared, and quite a few towns and villages have been established since then, but further inland remains wild and mostly unexplored. The previous attempts at taming the Gulf will have left lots of ruins, tombs, and other remnants of a bygone age that makes for classic dungeon crawling.

East and West

In the classic West Marches game, the adventure was, as the name implied, to the west, and civilization was back east. The Gulf of False Hope, however, is on the West Coast of its continent, meaning adventure is out east, and civilization to the west. There is no particular reason for this reversal, just that my very rough sketch of the Gulf placed it on the west coast.

The western (civilized) continent is called Asila, while the Gulf is on the continent of Pericolosa (not exactly subtle but still makes a cool name). In West Marches tradition, Asila is not a place for adventure, at least in terms of old-school dungeon crawling. No monstrous beasts, no unexplored ruins, no unmapped and unexplored sections of wilderness. Pericolosa, however, is the opposite. Outside of the (relatively) safe coastal areas, there are beasts and wild men, ruins and lost places, even dungeons and dragons.

Travel between Pericolosa and Asila takes about 4 to 8 weeks, depending on the winds and other factors. The Trade Winds along the latitude of the gulf tend eastward, so the return trip generally takes longer. It is not an impossible trip, but it is also not one that is made lightly, and, in the context of this game, if a PC gets on a boat to Asila, that is likely signaling that PC’s retirement.

The Salvatian League & The Gulf Colonies

I could probably spend a great deal of time going into the politics of Asila, but my efforts are best directed in keeping it to what is relevant for the game.
Most of the major sea powers of Asila have an interest in gaining the resources of Pericolosa, and over the last few decades, have been racing to claim their share of the pie. The region around the gulf is primarily occupied by the Salvatian League.

The Salvatian League is a loose federation of eight duchies. The federal government is an elective monarchy, with the eight dukes being both the sole electors and candidates. The Dukes generally see Pericolosa as a chance to not only expand the League’s power, but also their own power within the League, in hopes of leveraging that into becoming the next King or Queen.

The Salvatian League is a predominately human nation, with a noticeable Halfling minority. A few Dwarven Holds and Elven Forests exist as enclaves within its boarders, but aside from the traders, mostly keep to themselves. Salvati refers to the people, and the language (which replaces the common tongue given to all PCs), Salvatia is the name of the region, while goods and animals originating from there are Salvatian. Ethnic Salvati (of all 4 races), fall in line with the default rules in the rulebook, it’s boring, but it makes things easier.

Culturally, Salvati are a conservative society, and generally distrustful of outsiders or new ideas, although these traits are less pronounced in those that chose to start a new life in the Gulf, they are generally still present. They value self-reliance although not so much minding your own business. Both men and women Salvati are notorious gossips and rumor mongers; it is said that a Salvati would rather believe a well told tall tale than a boring truth.

This is starting to get a bit long, so I’ll leave other stuff for a future post. I still want to write on time/calendar, religion, locations within the gulf itself, and a handful of rumors/quest hooks for what is out there in the wilds, so those will likely be covered in a part 2.

Daydreaming About West Marches 

I’ve been having a craving for some good old-fashioned dungeon crawling lately, and that feeling that I could maybe squeeze just one more game in. Still I am not sure I want to have another regularly scheduled time that I have to dedicate solely to a game, and something more flexible I think would be more up my alley. And, like many gamers, I’ve read the classic blog posts about the West Marches style of play a few times before. While I’ve always kind of liked the idea behind it, my current gaming cravings are actually making me seriously consider starting up a West Marches game for the first time.

For those of you not familiar with the West Marches style game (and don’t want to read the link above), my key takeaways from it are as follows:

  • Exploration/Dungeon Crawl Focused: Classic old-school play, go out into the wilderness, and try to make your fortune braving ancient traps and terrible beasts. Not much of a ‘plot’ so much as getting rich and discovering the secrets of the region.
  • Dynamic Group/Scheduling: Unlike a normal game, there isn’t a set time or group, a session happens whenever the GM and enough players can get together to play one. This allows you to have a large group of people involved in the game while still keeping player count for actual sessions reasonable. It also means that sessions are not held up because someone is “missing” you just play with who is there.
  • Player Driven: Players are in charge of scheduling the sessions, and coming up with their goals for the session. The GM will come up with content, as well as rumors and clues to help give the players ideas, but the actual focus of the game is on what the players want to do.

That’s hitting all my buttons of what I want from my gaming right now, and so I figure it might be fun to give it a shot.

Thus far I am still in the high concept stage and haven’t started getting a group together or anything, but I’ve kinda been daydreaming and brainstorming for a little bit. In no particular order:

  • I’m thinking either D&D Basic (likely Moldvay), or, Torchbearer. Torchbearer is probably what I’d go with if I have my druthers, but it requires a little bit of hacking for a West Marches style game, and old D&D probably has a slightly lower buy-in threshold. Probably don’t want to do a modern D&D, as much as I love 4e, and do enjoy 5e, but the conventions have shifted away from a survivalist, resource management, style of play.
  • For the region, I am thinking of a place called “The Gulf of False Hope”. Across the sea from civilization, the Gulf has seen numerous settlement attempts in ages past, but all have fallen as the once great civilizations crumbled. The game takes place a few generations into a new settlement attempt, with some semblance of civilized society and established towns near the coast, while the interior is still mostly wilderness, with ruins of the previous attempts dotting the landscape.
  • Basically, just enough civilization to give the PCs a safe haven when they need it, but most of the region still being ripe for exploration.
  • I definitely want to include a mix of content:
    • Sources drawing from classic D&D modules, cool stuff I found online, some cleaned up random generator stuff, and of course plenty of my own content and creations.
    • I want to have plenty of stuff that new players could handle, but also stuff that might be out of the league of starting characters.
    • I think also a mix of vary serious fantasy stuff, and also some of the more goofy crap found in old D&D as well.
  • Actual ideas for content include:
    • A powerful green dragon makes its home in the area. Very dangerous, but its laid likely contains vast riches…
    • Beyond the mountains lies a desert, including a great trap filled pyramid.
    • Speaking of the mountains, I’d like to hide this classic module somewhere in there.
    • Some god old fashioned ruins, tombs of long lost knights, abandoned dwarven halls, an ancient coliseum, and crumbling castles
    • The Gulf itself is full of ancient wrecks and potential plunder,
      but also protected by creatures of the deep that have made their home there.
  • Definitely would like to meet new people and expand my IRL playgroup though this, perhaps encouraging established players to bring friends?

Still really in the daydreaming phase at this point, will let you all know if this goes anywhere!